« October 2015 | Main | December 2015 »

25-Year-Old Man Shot to Death in Montecito Heights NR15906lp

Montecito Heights: The Los Angeles Police Department Hollenbeck Area Homicide detectives are asking for the public's assistance to solve the murder of a 25-year-old man.

On Saturday, November 28, 2015, around 11:15 p.m., officers responded to the 4400 block of Mercury Avenue for a shooting investigation. The officers found Adrian Ernesto Posueloz on the ground suffering from a gunshot wound. Mr. Posueloz did not survive the injuries and was pronounced dead at scene.

The preliminary investigation has revealed that Mr. Posueloz and several of his friends were sitting in a parked car on Mercury Avenue. Unknown suspects inside a dark colored sedan drove up alongside their parked vehicle when a suspect got out of his car armed with a firearm and asked, "Where are you from?" Posueloz and his friends had no gang ties and as he tried to run away, the suspect shot him. The suspects fled from the scene in their car.

There is no further information at this time and the investigation is ongoing.

Anyone with information is urged to contact Homicide investigators at (213) 342-8964. During non-business hours or on weekends, calls should be directed to 1-877-LAPD-24-7 (1-877-527-3247). Anyone wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (800-222-8477). Tipsters may also contact Crime Stoppers by texting to phone number 274637 (C-R-I-M-E-S on most keypads) with a cell phone. All text messages should begin with the letters "LAPD." Tipsters may also go to www.lapdonline.org, and click on "Anonymous Web Tips."

 

 Follow @LAPDHQ  LAPD on Facebook
 Follow @lapolicefdtn

Class 5-14 Recruit Graduation

COP Grad Speech 11-25-15

October 31, 2014 – A Los Angeles Police Academy graduation ceremony was held this morning at the LAPD Administration Building plaza.  

Today’s ceremony featured 26 graduates.  Three will be officers for Los Angeles World Airports, and one will be for Los Angeles Port Police.  All recruits have completed 920 hours of training over the course of 24 weeks.  In eager anticipation of receiving their diplomas, the recruits proudly stood before Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, Department command staff, city officials and hundreds of spectators.   

Chief Beck enjoys and greatly looks forward to attending graduation ceremonies.  As always, he emphasized during his speech that being an LAPD officer is all about character, which is instilled in each graduate through support from family and friends.  He also reminded them about the importance of never breaking the law to enforce the law, a cornerstone of behavior he expects from all LAPD officers.

Recruits will be expected to spring into action almost immediately, as many will be deployed in the field at their respective LAPD divisions beginning as soon as Sunday, November 2.  Upholding long-standing Department traditions at the end of the ceremony, recruits vigorously recited their class chant and tossed their caps high into the air, symbolizing their triumph at the academy and the promise of success as LAPD’s newest officers.       


November 24, 2015 Weekly Police Commission Meeting

COP Media Update after Comm Mtg 11-24-15

BOPC Mtg 11-24-15

Commission President Matt Johnson opened the meeting and a quorum was established. There were no comments from the commissioners; so the meeting proceeded to the Report of the Chief of Police. Chief Charlie Beck began by mentioning last week’s terrorism readiness exercise conducted by the Department’s Metropolitan Division subsequent to the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, France. He said this was the first of many such preparedness operations the LAPD will be conducting. Secondly, Chief Beck expressed his pleasure with the Department’s annual holiday event from the previous weekend. Finally, because this coming Friday (Black Friday) is traditionally a heavy shopping day, he assured everyone that Department officers will be out in full force to ensure safety at local shopping centers and malls. Chief Beck went on to provide a crime report overview, including officer-involved shooting data, traffic-related crime statistics and the current number of personnel in the Department.

There were no Consent Agenda Items; so the meeting proceeded to Regular Agenda Items. There were five items, and the commissioners pulled Item 3A for discussion. The remaining items were approved as follows:

• Item 3B, the Department’s Report, dated November 9, 2015, relative to the Ethics Enforcement Section Quarterly Report, Second Quarter 2015, as set forth, was approved.
• Item 3C, the Department’s Report, dated November 17, 2015, relative to the fiscal year 2016/17 proposed budget, as set forth, was approved.
• Item 3D, the Department’s Report, dated November 12, 2015, relative to the grant application and award for the 2015 Port Security Grant Program, as set forth, was approved.
• Item 3E, the Executive Director’s Report, dated November 4, 2015, relative to the Official Police Garage Towing and Storage Rates for 2016 – posting completed, as set forth, was approved.

The meeting continued with the final order of business, Item 3A, the Department’s Report, dated November 5, 2015, relative to the Operations- South Bureau Narcotics Enforcement Detail Command Accountability Performance Audit (AD# 14-04). Operations- South Bureau Deputy Chief William Scott and others from the bureau represented the Department before the commission. They provided an overview of audit compliance rates and other salient aspects of the audit. Commissioner Kathleen Kim moved to approve the report, as set forth, with the requirement of an oral report (”spot check”) back to the commission in 90 days regarding improvements to some of the audit-related issues discussed with commissioners at today’s meeting. Commissioner Kim’s motion was then seconded and approved.


Shooting Kills Two and Injures Three

November 23, 2015                                       NR08213lp

 

Unsolved Double Homicide Results in $75K Reward

Los Angeles: The Los Angeles Police Department Robbery Homicide Division detectives are asking for the public’s help in identifying the suspect(s) responsible for the double homicide of Brenda Aguilera and Jonathan Plascencia.

On September 25, 2015 the Los Angeles City Council’s office approved a $75,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible.

 

 

April 28, 2008                                          NR08213rf

Los Angeles:  A gunman shot and killed two people as they sat in their car Sunday night, and shot and wounded three others who were sitting on a nearby porch.

On April 27, 2008, at about 10:45 p.m., Los Angeles Police Department officers responded to a “shots fired” radio call at 48th Street and Wall Street. When the officers arrived at the location they found three female victims suffering from non-life threatening gunshot wounds. 

Officers were directed to a car parked at the curb a short distance away.   There they discovered two additional gunshot victims inside.  Los Angeles City Fire Department paramedics pronounced Brenda Aguilera, 21-years of age, dead at scene.  Jonathan Plascencia, 20-years-old, was transported to a local hospital where he died a short time later.

Detectives believe that the shooter walked up to the car that Aguilera and Plascencia were seated in and shot both of them.  As the suspect was running from the scene he began firing rounds at the three victims sitting nearby.  Witnesses told police that the suspect, described only as a male Hispanic, left the area in a green van.

It is unknown if the shooting was gang related, and there is no known motive at this time.

Anyone with information concerning this case is asked to contact Detective D. Jaramillo at Robbery-Homicide Division, at (213) 486-6890. During non-business hours or on weekends, calls should be directed to 1-877-LAPD-24-7(877-527-3247). Anyone wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at 800-222-TIPS (800-222-8477). Tipsters may also contact Crime Stoppers by texting to phone number 274637 (C-R-I-M-E-S on most keypads) with a cell phone. All text messages should begin with the letters "LAPD." Tipsters may also go to LAPDOnline.org, click on "webtips" and follow the prompts.

 Follow @LAPDHQ  LAPD on Facebook
 Follow @lapolicefdtn

Man Found Murdered in Highland Park

Los Angeles: The Los Angeles Police Department's Northeast Division detectives are seeking the assistance of the community in identifying the suspect(s) responsible for the murder of 35-year-old Pete Cordero.

On November 22, 2015, around 2:10 a.m., Northeast patrol officers responded to a "shots fired" radio call in the 5000 block of Raphael Street. When officers arrived, they found a male Hispanic behind the wheel of a white Toyota Tundra, suffering from multiple gunshot wounds.

Los Angeles Fire Department paramedics responded and pronounced the victim dead at scene.

The motive of this incident appears to be gang related. The investigation is ongoing.

Anyone with information about the incident is urged to call Northeast Division Homicide Detective Burcher or Officer Watterson at (323) 344-5731. After hours, please call 1-877-LAPD-24-7 (1-877-527-3247). Anyone wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (800-222-8477). Tipsters may also contact Crime Stoppers by texting to phone number 274637 (C-R-I-M-E-S) on most keypads with a cell phone. All text messages should begin with the letters "LAPD." Tipsters may also go to www.lapdonline.org, and click on "Anonymous Web Tips.

 Follow @LAPDHQ  LAPD on Facebook
 Follow @lapolicefdtn

21-year-old Missing Female

UPDATE


Reyna Danielle Johnson-Calderon was located and safely reunited with her family.

 

Los Angeles:  The family of Reyna Danielle Johnson-Calderon and the Los Angeles Police Department Van Nuys Area request the public’s assistance in locating her.

On November 20, 2015, around 9:00 a.m., Ms. Johnson-Calderon left her home and was last seen in the 5100 block of Coldwater Canyon in the city of Sherman Oaks. Ms. Johnson-Calderon left home without telling anyone. Ms. Johnson-Calderon also left behind her purse, keys, phone and ID. Her car was also left at her residence.

Ms. Johnson-Calderon is described as a 21-year-old female Black, with brown hair and brown eyes.  She stands 5 feet 6 inches tall and weighs approximately 130 pounds.

Ms. Calderon is bi-polar and had recently made remarks about hurting herself.

If you have seen, or have any information regarding the whereabouts of Reyna Danielle Johnson-Calderon, please contact the Los Angeles Police Department Van Nuys Area Robbery, Detective Martinez at (818) 374-0080. During non-business hours or on weekends, calls should be directed to 1-877-LAPD-24-7(877-527-3247). Anyone wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at 800-222-TIPS (800-222-8477). Tipsters may also contact Crime Stoppers by texting to phone number 274637 (C-R-I-M-E-S on most keypads) with a cell phone. All text messages should begin with the letters "LAPD." Tipsters may also go to LAPDOnline.org, click on "webtips" and follow the prompts.

 Follow @LAPDHQ  LAPD on Facebook
 Follow @lapolicefdtn

45-year-old Missing Male

Los Angeles:  The family of Armand Zaharian and the Los Angeles Police Department Van Nuys Area request the public’s assistance in locating him.

On November 19, 2015, around 9:30 a.m., Mr. Zaharian was last seen in the 4100 block of North Murrieta Avenue in the City of Sherman Oaks.  Mr. Zaharian left his home in his car to go to his business in downtown Los Angeles.  Mr. Zaharian’s car was found in his usual parking spot near his business downtown. His family is concerned that he has not been heard from.

Mr. Zaharian is described as a 45-year-old male White, with brown hair and brown eyes.  He stands 5 feet 6 inches tall and weighs approximately 165 pounds.

If you have seen, or have any information regarding the whereabouts of Armand Zaharian, please contact the Los Angeles Police Department Van Nuys Area Robbery, Detective Martinez at (818) 374-0080. During non-business hours or on weekends, calls should be directed to 1-877-LAPD-24-7(877-527-3247). Anyone wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at 800-222-TIPS (800-222-8477). Tipsters may also contact Crime Stoppers by texting to phone number 274637 (C-R-I-M-E-S on most keypads) with a cell phone. All text messages should begin with the letters "LAPD." Tipsters may also go to LAPDOnline.org, click on "webtips" and follow the prompts.

 Follow @LAPDHQ  LAPD on Facebook
 Follow @lapolicefdtn

Police Commission President Matthew Johnson Outlines His Vision And Goals For The Los Angeles Police Department

Los Angeles – On Tuesday, November 10, 2015, Police Commission President Matthew Johnson stated the following:

“Nearly two months ago I took this chair for the first time and offered my thoughts on taking this very important position. At that time, I promised I would return to you with the initiatives I would like the Commission to support as we move forward. In that short time, I have dedicated myself to hearing the concerns of as many of our City’s residents as possible. I have spoken with community leaders, clergy, elected officials and everyday Angelinos. I have listened to those who have raised their concerns in our commission meetings. I have met with many members of the LAPD, from Command Staff to the rank and file. Today I am setting forth my agenda as Police Commission President. I am also requesting a series of audits and reports from both the Department and the Inspector General to achieve these goals.

The LAPD has had a challenging history which contributed to two riots and ultimately led to a Consent Decree. Under the Consent Decree, the Department was required to make major reforms that led to a positive institutional transformation of the LAPD. We must ensure that the Department remains committed to those tenets of reform and uses them as a foundation to continuously build upon and improve. We must remain focused on the Department’s commitment to constitutional, fair, respectful and unbiased policing of our extremely diverse city, particularly the African-American, Latino, LGBTQ and immigrant communities.

Despite the progress the LAPD has made, we are living in challenging times. The LAPD, like police departments across our country, is facing a crisis of confidence with minority communities, particularly African- Americans. As a result of both real and perceived racial disparities in policing, there are deepening wounds in Los Angeles and cities across our country. In addition, homicides, violent crimes, and property crimes are all rising.

My goal is to use these challenges as turning points, and make the LAPD the model for the entire nation. As President of the Police Commission, my vision is for Los Angeles to simultaneously enjoy both effective and constitutional policing. For this to occur, we need strong police leadership coupled with strong, effective oversight by the Police Commission. To that end, the Commission relies heavily upon to Office of the Inspector General’s robust and independent investigations and audits of the Department. The Commission, with the help of the Office of the Inspector General, must continue to vigilantly monitor these reforms as well as devise new and improved ways to oversee the Department’s operations.

I intend to focus on two important, measurable goals. First, we must reduce the crime rate. The single most important function of any government is keeping its citizens safe. After many years of consecutive yearly reductions in the crime rate, Los Angeles, like so many other cities in our nation, is seeing a significant uptick in essentially every category of crime. Through November 7, 2015, homicides are up 11.7%, violent crimes are up 21% and property crimes are up 10.8% for an overall 12.8% increase in Part I crime when compared to 2014. In August alone we saw 39 homicides, making it the deadliest month since August, 2007.

Second, we must fully commit to minimizing the number of use of force incidents. The LAPD Use of Force Policy specifically states that “The Department’s guiding value when using force shall be reverence for human life.” With that as our guiding principle, I am confident we can significantly reduce the number of use of force incidents while continuing to ensure the safety of our officers.

If successful, we will not only reduce the incidents of physical harm to both our residents and our Officers, we will also increase the level of trust and respect between the police and our community members. This will also reduce financial harm to the City and reduce the amount of organizational harm that invariably follows use of force incidents.

The Department has an impressive ability to use metrics to identify crime trends, shift resources, adapt to situations as they occur, and utilize the CompStat and Predictive Policing models to skillfully improve the policing of our City with its available resources. I have confidence in the Department’s ability to respond to these increasing crime statistics in a smart and effective manner. The vast majority of officers I have met are genuinely committed to effectively reducing crime, keeping our citizens safe and respecting people’s rights. As a Police Commission, we must ensure that the Police response is not only effective and efficient, but most importantly, constitutional. Our policing must respect our diverse communities and be carried out in a fair and impartial manner that respects the rights of all our residents -- while simultaneously respecting and caring for the safety of our officers.

While there is a place for crime suppression tactics, we must continue to focus on our successful Community Oriented Policing strategy and the Department’s newly launched strategy of Relationship Based Policing. From officers assigned to a foot beat or in a black and white patrol car, up to the Chief of Police, the Los Angeles Police Department must work to build genuine relationships with community members. These initiatives are essential in enabling our officers to connect with every community, build on our existing partnerships and develop new ones. Through those partnerships we will improve relationships one by one and work together to reduce crime.

As an example, the Department has shown great success in the Community Safety Partnership with the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA). By having dedicated officers in our public housing developments, the program has built meaningful relationships between officers and community members and has helped residents solve every day problems. The program has also resulted in a crime reduction of 21% since its inception in 2011. We clearly need to expand this program, and we will.

Further, the LAPD’s partnership with the Mayor’s Gang Reduction Youth Development (GRYD) program in conjunction with other Department efforts has reduced gang violence by 40% since its inception. The Summer Night Lights Program, which Mayor Garcetti has expanded to Friday Nights, has greatly assisted these efforts as well. Through these public/private partnerships, the City has shown us how these relationships improve the lives of residents and reduce crime. As a Commission, we need to support and foster these initiatives and make sure that the Department has the resources it needs to continue to grow and expand these efforts.

We can all agree that any use of force incident is one too many. However, it is important to note that while there were 128,366 arrests by Los Angeles Police Officers in 2014, a use of force occurred in only 1,898 of those arrests, a rate of 1.5%. Of that number, an Officer Involved Shooting occurred in 30 of those use of force incidents. It is also important to note however, that in year to date in comparison to 2014, Officer Involved Shootings have nearly doubled, increasing from 23 to 45. This is an alarming development. I believe we can work towards vastly reducing the number of use of force incidents through extensive training and modifying our tactics.

The LAPD rightfully takes pride in its role as the national leader in the development of police training and tactics in the law enforcement community. But with that desire to lead comes responsibility. The Department must continue to review, improve, and evolve our training and tactics from the first days of the police academy throughout our officer’s careers, even for the most experienced police officers. The Commission received an extensive briefing from the Department during our September 22nd meeting on the revised training program to even better prepare our police officers.

This training includes four components:

• Public Trust and Preservation of Life
• Constitutional Policing
• Handling persons suspected of being mentally ill
• Use of Force De-escalation Techniques

In particular, the Department’s focus on use of force de-escalation techniques and training in dealing with people suspected of being mentally ill are critical

components in minimizing encounters that result in use of force. We need to ensure that this training is effective and that there is enthusiastic acceptance from the Command Staff through every level of the Department. The initial Stand Down training conducted over the past several months plus the new training to be launched later this month is an encouraging start. It clearly puts us at the forefront of these efforts nationwide. But, culture and habits do not change overnight. To accomplish these necessary changes we will need continual training and reinforcement of the new expectations. We will have to reward excellence and hold accountable those who do not comply. We cannot expect to change behavior if there are not real consequences for those found to be out of policy.

In addition to supporting community and relationship based policing initiatives and increased training, we must also ensure that our officers have the best equipment to support our efforts to reduce incidents of deadly use of force while continuing to keep our officers safe. Thanks in large part to Commissioner Soboroff’s efforts and Mayor Garcetti’s leadership, Los Angeles will soon be the largest city in America to put Body Worn Cameras on every officer on the street. I believe that the widespread deployment of Body Worn Cameras and Digital In-Car Video System cameras will be transformative for policing by reducing both use of force and biased policing.

Early research supports that officers wearing cameras have significantly fewer use of force incidents and complaints than officers not wearing the cameras. Body Worn Cameras will benefit both community members and the police officers who wear them. Overall, the research found that when police officers are aware that their behavior is being monitored through on-body cameras and when residents are aware they are being recorded, everyone behaves better.

Thanks to a recent directive by Chief Beck, soon all police officers in the field will be equipped with and required to carry a Taser device -- allowing less than lethal use of force when called for. I would also like to see bean bag shot guns more widely deployed. These resources can save lives by preventing a deadly use of force from occurring. Our training and tactics must use less than lethal options in a manner that maximizes their effectiveness and minimizes the use of deadly force.

I am confident that the combination of these initiatives -- a commitment to providing the most current Training and Tactics, doubling down on Community Oriented and Relationship Based Policing, the full deployment of Body Worn Cameras, the Digital In-Car Video system cameras, and ensuring that our officers have the best equipment available including Tasers and bean bag shotguns -- will simultaneously help us reduce crime, decrease use of force incidents, and increase the level of trust between our communities and the Police Department that serves them.

But we must recognize that it is not just about crime and statistics. This work requires everyone in Los Angeles to accept more responsibility. Respect is a two-way street, and communities and police in Los Angeles must work together. Though much work lies ahead, the changes we make in our city will serve as an

example to other cities facing the same issues. As we begin to see the transformative results in our city, we will all have helped create a greater Los
Angeles for our future generations as well as a model for police departments around the world to follow.

In conclusion, I request concurrence from my fellow Commissioners with the following:

1. That the office of the Inspector General analyze the Department’s Categorical use of force over the last decade. The report should break down the various types of force used over that time period, and detail the changes in training and policies that have occurred over that same period. This report will include the office of the Inspector General identifying the rates of injury to community members and officers associated with uses of force, and the adjudicated outcomes for those cases that have occurred.

2. That the office of the Inspector General prepare a report comparing deadly use of force by the LAPD to other large agencies in our country. This report should provide the basis for an informed discussion on the rate and manner of the Department’s uses of force.

3. Building on the comments of Chief Beck last week, that the Department work with the Inspector General and the Commission’s Use of Force sub-committee, consisting of Commissioner Saltzman, and myself to develop an annual categorical use of force report format, with the emphasis on breaking down uses of force in a manner that is useful to the Police commission in its oversight and policy-making role, the Department, and the public. A final draft of the format should be completed for review and approval by the Commission within 30 days, to be implemented by the Department 60 days from Commission approval.

4. That the office of the Inspector General review the Department’s use of what is commonly called “less than lethal force” to examine how the Department can improve the use of Tasers, Bean Bag Shotguns and other less than lethal options, particularly in the handling of persons suspected of being mentally ill and the handling of persons with knives or weapons other than firearms, in an effort to reduce incidents of Officer involved Shootings.

5. That the office of the Inspector General monitor and attend the new training initiatives and issue a report evaluating their effectiveness once completed.

6. That the Department, in concert with the office of the Inspector General, develop a comprehensive audit and inspection plan related to Body Worn Cameras that reviews the usage of these cameras to identify training issues, concerns with existing policies, and constitutional policing issues. The office of the Inspector General is further asked to design its own plans to monitor the use of these videos.

It is important to note that these audits and reports are not ends in and of themselves. They will be tools to guide us how and where we can improve the
Page 6

Department. Once we have this information, it will be our collective responsibility -- the Department, this Commission, and the Community -- to use it to continue the reform efforts that began with the Consent Decree and to build the LAPD into
the best trained, best equipped, most professional and most respected police organization in America. Together, we will make our City the safest big city in America, and become a model for constitutional policing for the nation.

Thank you.”


Arrest Made in Robbery of Designer Watches

Los Angeles: The Los Angeles Police Department's West Los Angeles Area robbery detectives have arrested 26-year-old Dominic Calloway in connection to a robbery inside a local mall.

On August 24, 2015, around 11:57 a.m., West Los Angeles Division patrol officers responded to a radio call inside a Century City mall in the 10250 block of Santa Monica Boulevard. Two male Black suspects entered a jewelry store wearing black ski masks, all black clothing, and armed with long rifles.

The suspects forced their way inside the jewelry store, as the security guard attempted to close the door. The first suspect discharged a round into the store, striking a display wall of glass. Both suspects directed everyone to lay on the floor. The second suspect, later identified as Calloway, ran directly to a display case and took several designer, high value watches.

Both suspects ran down an escalator and fled the location in a stolen grey Toyota Camry driven by a third suspect, which was waiting in the parking lot.

Calloway was arrested on November 11, 2015, at his home in South Los Angeles without incident.

The first suspect is described as a male Black, 30 to 40-years-old, who stands 5 feet and 10 inches tall and weighs around 180 pounds. He was seen wearing a black ski mask and all black clothing.

There is no description of the third suspect.

Anyone with information in regards to this case are urged to call West Los Angeles Area detectives at (310) 444-1580. During non-business hours or on weekends, calls should be directed to 1-877-LAPD-24-7 (877-527-3247). Anyone wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (800-222-8477). Tipsters may also contact Crime Stoppers by texting to phone number 274637 (C-R-I-M-E-S on most keypads) with a cell phone. All text messages should begin with the letters "LAPD." Tipsters may also go to www.lapdonline.org, and click on "Anonymous Web Tips."

 

 Follow @LAPDHQ  LAPD on Facebook
 Follow @lapolicefdtn

Missing UCLA Student

November 23, 2015                     NR15898jk

UPDATE

In the late afternoon of November 20, 2015, items believed to belong to Michael Meyers were found in a recent avalanche debris field near Mt. Irvine.  Additional resources were requested including a search dog team and sonar type equipment.  On November 21, 2015 Mr. Myers was found deceased by Inyo County Sheriff Department.

 

Los Angeles: The family of Michael David Meyers and the Los Angeles Police Department's Missing Persons Unit requests the public's assistance in locating him.

On November 5, 2015 he texted his roommate advising that he was going to Mount Russell in Inyo National Park. Meyers is an experienced hiker and climber, accustomed to going on excursions for several days alone. ATM records show that he bought water and gas at a gas station located on the way up to Mount Russell. He was driving a 2002 grey Dodge SUV, license plate number 7DIB540, which also has not been located. His family is very concerned for his safety and well-being.

Meyers is described as a 25-year-old male White with brown hair and blue eyes. He stands 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighs approximately 150 pounds.

If you have seen, or have any information regarding the whereabouts of Meyers, please contact the Los Angeles Police Department, Missing Persons Unit, Detective A. Mercado: (213) 996-1800. During non-business hours or on weekends, calls should be directed to 1-877-LAPD-24-7 (877-527-3247). Anyone wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at 800-222-TIPS (800-222-8477). Tipsters may also contact Crime Stoppers by texting to phone number 274637 (C-R-I-M-E-S on most keypads) with a cell phone. All text messages should begin with the letters "LAPD." Tipsters may also go to LAPDOnline.org, click on "webtips" and follow the prompts.

 Follow @LAPDHQ  LAPD on Facebook
 Follow @lapolicefdtn