Chief’s Message December 2011

As the calendar turns to December and the end of the year draws upon us, I want to thank you for all of your hard work throughout the year.  I know you hear me say it a lot but I feel as though I can’t say it enough.  It seems as though every year you manage to build upon our successes and achieve results of historic proportions and for that the City owes you a debt of gratitude.  

This year was nothing short of outstanding.  We are projected to have a 5% decrease in total Part I crime for the year, a tremendous accomplishment.  As the City continues to struggle with financial issues you have stayed on course and made a difference.   

This was also a year of firsts.  We experienced the promotion of Regina Scott from the rank of Captain to the rank of Commander.  She becomes the first African-American female promoted to that rank and she certainly won’t be the last.  We also held the very first Purple Heart Ceremony honoring our heroic officers, past and present, which have been killed or wounded in the line of duty.  This was an award that was long overdue. These firsts were groundbreaking for this organization and are something we should be quite proud of.

The holiday season is all about giving and I also want to let you know how much I appreciate what all the divisions do for those less fortunate in our communities.  Whether it’s Rampart’s benefit for blind children or Southeast’s toy giveaway, every division does something which spreads holiday cheer to those who might need it most.  It makes me proud to see you put just as much emphasis on the “serving” as we do the “protecting”.

In keeping with the spirit of giving there is one way you can give to each other that can be invaluable to those who need it most; by contributing to the Catastrophic Illness fund.  The Catastrophic Illness fund is a special fund which is available to those officers who have experienced a major illness or injury and have exhausted all of their benefits.  This fund is made possible by the generous donation of TO or vacation time by sworn members of our Department.  

Donating time is easy. Simply go to the Department LAN and click on LAPD Forms. Type in “Catastrophic Illness” and the donation form will come up.  Complete the form and submit it to FOD.  There is no limit to the number of hours you can give and you can donate at any time.

I have seen firsthand how this program has given our officers more paid time off to heal.  What better gift than to give a brother or sister in need the gift of peace of mind. Please consider it.

Throughout this past year the LAPD has been successful because of the tremendous support and cooperation we get from our City family.  This year we want to specially recognize the following people who went far beyond the call of duty to help the Department accomplish our missions.  Whether it’s planning for Carmageddon and keeping traffic flowing, fighting to help us maintain our budget, defending our officers against lawsuits or spearheading our gang intervention programs,we want to send a special thanks to the following members of our extended City family:

  • Deputy Mayor Ilene Decker - Office of the Mayor
  • Supervising Attorney Cory Brente - City Attorney
  • Transportation Engineer Aram Sahakian - Department of Transportation
  • Director GuillermoCespedes - Office of the Mayor, Gang Reduction and Youth Development

As you gather to spend time with your family and friends during the holidays, please keep in your thoughts your brothers and sisters who will be working during this time.  We are a 24/7 operation and not everyone will be able to spend time with their loved ones.  Some of our PSR’s, detectives, records clerks, patrol officers and many others will be spending the holidays away from their loved ones, serving their community and for that we are grateful.

Please keep in your thoughts and prayers our officers currently serving on active duty in the military.  Keep them close to your heart, as we look forward to their safe return:

  • Police Officer III Christine Bulicz        Serial No. 34690    U.S. Air Force
  • Police Officer II Jonathan Chandler    Serial No. 38434    U.S. Navy
  • Police Officer II Terrence Collins       Serial No. 38318    U.S. Army
  • Police Officer II Renee Escobedo      Serial No. 34922    U.S. Army
  • Police Officer III Richard Gadsby      Serial No. 31981    U.S. Army
  • Sergeant I Billy Gilbert                    Serial No. 31491    U.S. Army
  • Police Officer II Edward Hewitt        Serial No. 39644    U.S. Army
  • Police Officer II Mario Jacinto          Serial No. 36322    U.S. Army
  • Sergeant II Michael Johnson            Serial No. 31570    U.S. Air Force
  • Police Officer II August Lopez          Serial No. 38285    U.S. Army
  • Police Officer II Kevin Marshall        Serial No. 38399    U.S. Army
  • Sergeant II Jose Martinez               Serial No. 32879    U.S. Army
  • Police Officer II Rigoberto Torres    Serial No. 39788    U.S. Army
  • Police Officer III Brandon Valdez     Serial No. 36464    U.S. Marines
  • Police Officer II Jason Valles            Serial No. 38022    U.S. Army
  • Police Officer II Ruben Vargas         Serial No. 38825    U.S. Marines
  • Police Officer II Roy Yoo                Serial No. 39248    U.S Army
  • Police Officer II James Zourek        Serial No. 34445    U.S. Marines

Finally we must never forget the active, former or retired sworn and civilian members of our Department we lost this past year.  Their loss leaves a permanent void in the heart of our organization:

  • Captain III William “Bill” Eaton, Serial No. 26957, EOW 1/13/11
  • Retired Sergeant Audrey L. Melane, Serial No. 3266, EOW 1/15/11
  • Retired Investigator III Roland E. Phillips, Serial No. 6089, EOW 1/25/11
  • Retired Police Officer III Lester Vargas, Serial No. 24565, EOW 2/6/11
  • Retired Sergeant Gerald “Jerry” Moon, Serial No. 6262, EOW 2/9/11
  • Police Officer II Frank Nicholas Hernandez, Serial No. 30889, EOW 2/18/11
  • Detention Officer Dilys W. Sandy, Serial No. V9415, EOW 4/2/11
  • Retired Sergeant I Scott Timothy Slinkard, Serial No. 21640, EOW 4/22/11
  • Police Officer II Jose C. Diance, Serial No. 40316, EOW 4/23/11
  • Retired Police Officer III Gerald Allen Jones, Serial No. 11635, EOW 4/27/11
  • Retired Detective III John Wesley Hunter, Serial No. 14303, EOW 5/3/11
  • Specialist Reserve Police Officer Royce Flowers, Serial No. R2813, EOW 5/5/11
  • Retired Police Investigator III Raymond J. Blackwell Jr., Serial No. 6318, EOW 5/7/11
  • Retired Sergeant II John “Jack” Lambert Sommers Jr., Serial No. 17769, EOW 5/8/11
  • Retired Investigator III Arthur C. Fuentes, Serial No. 3947, EOW 5/9/11
  • Sr. Police Service Representative I April Christine Hoff, Serial No. V8498, EOW 5/27/11
  • Senior Clerk Typist Adrien Yvette Shields, Serial No. G8637, EOW 6/10/11
  • Retired Lieutenant II Wayne Walter Mackley, Serial No. 10258, EOW 6/18/11
  • Retired Police Officer Charles Clinton Wright, Serial No. 16550, EOW 7/10/11
  • Retired Police Officer II Dennis George Farnham, Serial No. 15186, EOW 7/16/11
  • Retired Police Officer II+6 Charles “Chuck” D. Perriguey, Serial No. 17318, EOW 7/16/11
  • Former Police Officer II Barry A. Wojciechowski, Serial No. 26616, EOW 7/23/11
  • Retired Police Investigator II John Raymond Petersen, Serial No. 5020, EOW 7/26/11
  • Retired Detective II Virginio “Val” Santiago, Serial No. 15591, EOW 7/26/11
  • Retired Police Officer III Stephen L. Beidle, Serial No. 17776, EOW 7/29/11
  • Retired Lieutenant David Wheeler, Serial No. 7776, EOW 8/7/11
  • Retired Police Officer III James Leonard Gleason, Serial No. 7451, EOW 8/8/11
  • Retired Police Woman Investigator II Nan Lou Allomong, Serial No. 5997, EOW 8/12/11
  • Detective II Jesus “Jesse” Ravega, Serial No. 25151, EOW 9/2/11
  • Retired Detective III Felix P. Estrada, Serial No. 12124, EOW 9/3/11
  • Retired Police Investigator III Stephen D. Broadhurst, Serial No. 3335, EOW 9/4/11
  • Retired Sergeant I Dale Barton Bootow, Serial No. 7894, EOW 9/8/11
  • Detective II Yolanda Echols, Serial No. 26115, EOW 09/08/11
  • Police Officer Chris David Eilers, Serial No. 38274, EOW 9/12/11
  • Retired Detective III James A. Pitman, Serial No. 7248, EOW 9/30/11
  • Retired Captain III Holbert Dodson “Bob” Burns, Serial No. 3344, EOW 10/7/11
  • Retired Police Officer III Richard Laitres, Serial No. 15778, EOW 10/8/11
  • Retired Sergeant Fredrick Smith, Serial No. 6181, EOW 10/12/11
  • Retired Police Investigator III John Allen Olsen, Serial No. 5139, EOW 10/16/11


Have a wonderful holiday season and I look forward to serving alongside you in 2012.  
Take care and be safe,
Charlie


Chief’s Message November 2011

The month of November holds a special significance for me.  Two years ago this month, I had the privilege of being appointed Chief of this proud and distinguished organization.  It was an exciting and humbling time for me.  More importantly, it was the opportunity of a lifetime.

Police work has long been in my blood.  I come from a family with deep ties to the LAPD and I wear my badge with tremendous pride.  I take very seriously the honor of representing you, the sworn and civilian members of our Department.

As a matter of fact, the best part of the job is the time that I spend with you.  Whether it is working patrol, riding with the bike detail and mounted units, or answering 911 calls with our PSRs at Communications Division, I value our time together.  I’ve worked with our garage mechanics, rode with our motor cops and flown as a TFO with Air Support Division.  I’ve done all of this in order to hear what you want from the Department and your Chief.  I learn more in a day working with the men and women of the LAPD than I do in a week of meetings in the building.  This is the part of my job that I truly love.

Frankly, I’m not sure anyone can effectively lead an organization as complex as ours from a downtown office building.  So long as I am Chief, I will devote as much time as possible out of the office, learning the concerns of officers, civilian employees and the public we serve.

One of the most important things I’ve learned from my experiences in the field is that nothing works unless we treat people right.  That means not just serving the public with courtesy and professionalism.  It means treating each other with dignity, respect and brotherhood, irrespective of rank, assignment, civilian or sworn, male or female or any other kind of distinction you can make.  Let me be very clear on this; no one at LAPD has license to abuse anyone else for any reason at any time, or in any situation or medium.  We simply will not tolerate behavior that fails to meet this standard.

When I began my term, I set specific goals to reinforce our standing as a world-class leader in law enforcement.

One goal is Constitutional Policing.  For the past two years, Constitutional Policing is the centerpiece of how we do business.  We are accountable not only for what we do, but for how we do it.  We could not have achieved the unprecedented crime reductions of recent years without holding ourselves to the highest professional standards.

Improvement in employee wellness is another important goal. If you are not well physically, mentally or emotionally, you can’t perform to the best of your ability.  The high level of employee participation in departmental sports, along with our tremendous success in numerous multi-agency athletic competitions, demonstrates our continued commitment to this goal.  Your well-being is extremely important to me and something that I take very seriously.  This job is a family business to me and when I hear about our employees being sick or injured, it is very difficult for me, because I care about each and every one of you.

This really came to light while I was at my monthly meeting at Pacific Division.  I was asked what my biggest challenge has been since I’ve had this job.  I have to say, tragedy.  Tragedy has been the toughest challenge to deal with as Chief.  When I hear about our employees stricken with a sudden illness or injury, I make every effort to call or visit them.  Over the past two years we, as a family, have had to deal with some extremely difficult and unexpected deaths.  This is where you come in…please look after each other and always be there for each other.

In addition to these goals, we achieved other important accomplishments.  We saw the implementation of in-car video systems, bringing us in-line with other agencies already deploying this 21st Century technology.  We opened the Metropolitan Detention Center, eliminated the DNA Rape Kit backlog, and developed the Police Cadet Program to cultivate the tremendous talent of our City’s youth and build LAPD’s future.  Our partnerships with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies have yielded impressive results, and our community outreach programs have deepened and strengthened existing relationships with the many diverse communities we serve.

Perhaps our greatest achievement has been the continued reduction in Part Icrime and gang crimes.  In the past two years, we have seen a 12% drop in Part I crime and realized a resounding 24% drop in gang-related crimes.  These results are even more impressive in light of the City’s deep fiscal challenges.

None of these accomplishments would have occurred without you.  I am deeply grateful for your unfailing hard work and tireless commitment to the people of the City of Los Angeles who look to us to ensure the safety of their communities.  I can only be as good as the people with whom I work and I am truly blessed to serve with the most dedicated professionals in law enforcement. I look forward to working with more of you in the coming years.

Veterans Day

During November, we celebrate the men and women who have served and continue to serve our country in the armed forces.  Our country would not be the greatest in the world without the selfless efforts of our military.  Let us not forget the many sworn and civilian members of the Department who serve both their city and their country.

This Veterans Day please keep in your thoughts the memories of Officers RJ Cottle and Josh Cullins who died last year on active duty in Afghanistan.  Their sacrifice, and the sacrifice of their families, still resonates with us today.  We will be forever grateful for their service.

We all know someone who has served or is currently serving our country.  If you have the opportunity, take the time to thank them.  Our heroes certainly deserve it.

Holidays

As the holiday season approaches, I would like to invite you to the 2011 Chief’s Holiday Party.  This year’s event will take place Saturday, December 10th at the J.W Marriott Hotel at LA Live.

I hope you will be able to join me and our many colleagues for an evening of delicious food, good friends and holiday merriment.  The season is about sharing with family and friends; I personally invite you to join me for this year’s celebration and look forward to seeing you there.


Chief of Police Message - October 2011

I hope this message finds you well.  I want to begin this month’s message with a topic that is very important to me.  Family.  I often speak of my work family because that’s what our Department is; a family.  The bond we share is one that few people outside our profession truly understand.  This bond carries us through difficult times and helps us realize that the job we are entrusted to do comes with great responsibility, and we cannot do it alone.  

There are those within our organization who carry a gun and wear a badge, and those who do not, but who fully understand our brotherhood and our LAPD family as well.  They are our civilian employees.     

LAPD’s civilian work force is the backbone of our organization; the glue that holds everything together in this family.  They are the support network on which we constantly depend.  Without them, 911 calls for service would go unanswered; reports would not be entered; forensic evidence would not be analyzed; information systems would be non-existent and our fleet of vehicles would not be serviced.  LAPD’s civilian work force is absolutely vital to our day-to-day operations and to our success as a Department.     

In recent years, our entire civilian staff has had to endure mandatory unpaid time off due to the City’s ongoing fiscal crisis.  This has had a profoundly adverse effect on their financial situations.  They have had to give up many important things in order to support themselves and their families.  Despite this burden, they continue to perform at a level of professionalism that is second to none.

During the month of October we will recognize our civilian brothers and sisters during the
2nd Annual Civilian Appreciation Month.  I am tremendously proud to serve alongside such a dedicated and talented group, and I know our sworn workforce shares my sentiment.  So the next time you need that DR number or you have that question about your time, stop and take a minute to say “Thank You.”  Our civilians more than deserve it.  Take the effort to demonstrate that they are part of our family.

Mental Illness  

Working in a large and diverse city like Los Angeles you come across many different types of people.  Los Angeles is a melting pot of cultures, ethnicities, personalities and characters.  As a first responder you get to see this first hand.  

When you first come in contact with individuals on a radio call or a traffic stop, there is really no telling what to expect.  There is no pre-screening process to determine the type of person you are about to encounter.  This is why training is so important.

Recently officers from another law enforcement agency were involved in a use of force with a mentally ill subject.  The incident garnered considerable negative public and media attention and was another reminder to us of the complexities you will come across in the field.

Dealing with the mentally ill or mentally challenged requires special attention to detail in order to assure yours and the subject’s safety.  This is why our Department offers special training such as the Autism Awareness Training and the Mental Health Introduction Course, held just last month.  These programs heighten your awareness of the signs and symptoms of mental illness and help you better understand how to deal with mentally ill subjects.  

Use of Force

Police officers are the only public servants legally authorized to use force while trying to protect people or property.  This is a special privilege that must not be abused.  We all know how serious a use of force can be.  Reputations, careers and even lives may be at stake.  I want to remind you that in this day and age of instant messaging, social media, camera phones and digital technology, you should always assume someone is watching and recording all of your public actions.  

As your Chief, you will have my full support if you are ever involved in a use of force where, within the bounds set by Department policy, you are protecting the lives or safety of the public or each other.  However, any unauthorized use of force will not and cannot be tolerated.  

In the heat of the moment I know your adrenaline is pumping and your emotions are keyed up, but you must manage to maintain your composure.  If you see that your partner might start getting a little carried away, step in and defuse the situation.  Look out for each other and take care of each other.  Don’t put yourself or your partner in a position which could jeopardize your careers.

Commendable Caper
 
On July 28, 2011, officers from Central Division responded to an “Attempt Suicide” radio call.  The officers arrived on scene and with the help of Air 18, they located the distraught male on top of a 12-story building, standing on the ledge.  

The officers attempted to make contact with him, but he was nonresponsive and was inching towards the ledge.  Without hesitation, the officers reached out and grabbed the subject just as he stepped off the ledge, becoming dead weight in their arms.  Struggling to not drop him, even after he bit one of the rescuing officers on the arm, the initial three officers holding onto him received much needed help when other Central officers arrived on the roof.  With a coordinated team effort, the officers were able to secure the subject to the railing using a hobble restraint and handcuffs, and continued to hold onto him until the fire department arrived and assisted in completing the rescue effort.  

Due to the outstanding work and dedication of the officers on scene, a potential tragedy was averted and the subject was able to get the help he so desperately needed.  Thanks to the following Central Area personnel:


P-3 Manuel Armendariz #35292
P-3 Robert Reich #36401
P-2 Mario Botello #37159
P-2 Ruben Cantu #36843
P-2 Arthur Gonzalez #38846
P-2 Rick Linton #38456
P-2 Jorge Ortega #38863
P-2 John Padilla #39168
P-2 Blair Roth #38153


Every day you have the opportunity to have a positive impact in the communities you serve.  Take advantage of that.  Know that cops count, character counts, do the right thing and you can be the difference.    
 
Detective II Jesse Ravega, Serial No. 25151

On September 2, 2011, my heart was heavy and I was overwhelmed with sadness when I learned of Jesse’s tragic death.  This is yet another one of our brother officers, taken from us much too soon.  Jesse was assigned to Foothill Gang Detectives, and was well respected by coworkers and the community.  This will be a difficult time for them as they cope with this sudden void in their lives.  Please keep Jesse’s wife, three children and his work family at Foothill Area, in your prayers.  Jesse will certainly be missed, but not forgotten.  


Chief of Police Message - September 2011

In the early morning hours of September 11, 2001, our country and specifically American law enforcement was forever changed.  The terrorist attacks that murdered thousands of innocent Americans in New York’s Twin Towers, the Pentagon and on United Flight 93 are burned permanently into our memories.  Particularly painful, we saw our brothers and sisters from the NYPD and FDNY not hesitating for a second to put themselves in harm’s way only to fall victim to that attack.

In the years since we have made many reforms, not just at the national level but at the local level as well.  As a Department we formed what is known today as the Counter-Terrorism and   Special Operations Bureau.  The iWatch program was also born in the aftermath of 9/11.  LAPD’s proactive commitment to protecting our City has made us a national leader in counter-terrorism practices.

As we commemorate the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, keep the memory of our fallen brothers and sisters alive by continued vigilance. We can never become complacent. Although some incidents have not been made public, it is important to know that working closely with our federal partners, we have already prevented a number of potential terrorist attacks on our city.  We must continue to be vigilant and never become complacent.  There is no better way to honor our fallen heroes.

New Northeast Station
Over the past decade our Department has been able to upgrade many of our facilities thanks to the voter-approved Proposition Q.  Some of these upgrades included replacement stations for Harbor, Hollenbeck, Rampart and West Valley Areas.  The Metropolitan Detention Center, Emergency Operations Center, Valley and Metro Bomb Squad facilities, Valley Bureau and Topanga Area Station were brand new facilities also built with these funds.
During the construction process we made every effort to keep costs to a minimum and to complete the projects on time.  As a result, we have money left over.  With these remaining funds, our attention turned to the aging Northeast Station.

On July 19, 2011, the City Council approved use of remaining Proposition Q Bond funds for the construction of a replacement facility for Northeast.  The new station will be built on the existing Northeast site and the design will be an adaptation of the new Olympic Station.  Currently the replacement project only includes the construction of the new station, but there are plans for a new parking structure and Motor Transport facility that will be constructed when additional funds are available.

The replacement of Northeast Station has been the highest priority for the Department’s construction program since completion of the Proposition Q projects and the new Police Administration Building.  The City family, including the Office of the Chief Administrative Officer, the Chief Legislative Analyst, the Bureau of Engineering and the Architects of the facility all worked together with the LAPD to make the Northeast project possible out of the existing bond funds.  We expect to break ground in the summer of 2012.  Before then, Facilities Management Division will be meeting with Northeast employees to provide them with information on the project and solicit their input.

Officer Safety
As your Chief, your safety is my top priority.  I am always looking for ways to improve safety for you.  But officer safety is not just about wearing your seatbelt or dodging bullets.  Officer safety entails much more.
Recently there have been reports in the media of law enforcement personnel from other agencies resorting to fraudulent schemes or other law breaking actions because of precarious financial positions their lifestyle put them in.  Careers and families have been lost. This is unfortunate and more importantly, unnecessary.

One of the benefits of working for LAPD is the variety of help available to you. Organizations such as the Los Angeles Police Relief Association and the Los Angeles Police Protective League, along with internal sections such as Behavioral Science Services, have services available to assist you in a time of need.  Whether it’s financial, personal or even emotional distress, there is someone here to help. Use that help.  Don't forget about our Department peer counselors and support groups always available to you as well.
The key to everything is to keep a watchful eye on each other.  If one of your partners is in physical danger, you grab them by the Sam-brown.  If one of your partners is in financial trouble, get them the help they need. We are a family and family takes care of each other.
 
Purple Heart Ceremony

During the month of September we begin a new tradition which recognizes the brave actions of some of our most heroic officers. The new Purple Heart Medal will serve as a reminder to the many life and death dangers you face every day.

For the first time in our Department’s history, we are awarding the Purple Heart Medal for meritorious service to officers who have sustained traumatic physical injury during an on-duty tactical situation, and posthumously to the next of kin in the name of officers killed or have died of wounds received in the line of duty.

The Department is proud to present this award as an opportunity to commemorate the extraordinary sacrifices of noble Los Angeles Police Department officers.  The first Purple Heart ceremony will be held at the JW Marriott at L.A. Live on September 15, 2011. I hope you can join us for this very special event.

Thoughts and Prayers
In late July, five of our officers suffered serious duty related injuries during two separate incidents in Topanga and Hollenbeck Areas. In the first incident, four officers from Topanga Division were involved in a serious T/C which resulted in each of them being hospitalized for injuries sustained.  Police Officers Brian Thornton and Kurt Logan were treated for minor injuries and released.  Police Officer Francisco Rubio was admitted to the hospital, treated and released a few days later.  However, Police Officer Mark De la Torre suffered major injuries and was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit where he remains hospitalized, in serious condition, as I write this month’s article. In the second incident, Police Officer Allan Krish, Hollenbeck Division, was stabbed during a violent confrontation with a 415 man.  Thankfully, Officer Krish is expected to make a full recovery from his injuries.

These incidents are yet another reminder of the dangers we face every day as Los Angeles Police Officers.  Please keep these five officers in your prayers and please keep an eye out for all your brother and sister officers.  I want to remind you to always be aware of your surroundings, watch everyone’s hands, assume nothing and expect the unexpected.


Chief of Police Message - September 2011

In the early morning hours of September 11, 2001, our country and specifically American law enforcement was forever changed. The terrorist attacks that murdered thousands of innocent Americans in New York’s Twin Towers, the Pentagon and on United Flight 93 are burned permanently into our memories. Particularly painful, we saw our brothers and sisters from the NYPD and FDNY not hesitating for a second to put themselves in harm’s way only to fall victim to that attack.

In the years since we have made many reforms, not just at the national level but at the local level as well. As a Department we formed what is known today as the Counter-Terrorism and Special Operations Bureau. The iWatch program was also born in the aftermath of 9/11.  LAPD’s proactive commitment to protecting our City has made us a national leader in counter-terrorism practices.

As we commemorate the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, keep the memory of our fallen brothers and sisters alive by continued vigilance. We can never become complacent. Although some incidents have not been made public, it is important to know that working closely with our federal partners, we have already prevented a number of potential terrorist attacks on our city.  We must continue to be vigilant and never become complacent. There is no better way to honor our fallen heroes.

New Northeast Station

Over the past decade our Department has been able to upgrade many of our facilities thanks to the voter-approved Proposition Q. Some of these upgrades included replacement stations for Harbor, Hollenbeck, Rampart and West Valley Areas. The Metropolitan Detention Center, Emergency Operations Center, Valley and Metro Bomb Squad facilities, Valley Bureau and Topanga Area Station were brand new facilities also built with these funds.

During the construction process we made every effort to keep costs to a minimum and to complete the projects on time. As a result, we have money left over. With these remaining funds, our attention turned to the aging Northeast Station.

On July 19, 2011, the City Council approved use of remaining Proposition Q Bond funds for the construction of a replacement facility for Northeast. The new station will be built on the existing Northeast site and the design will be an adaptation of the new Olympic Station. Currently the replacement project only includes the construction of the new station, but there are plans for a new parking structure and Motor Transport facility that will be constructed when additional funds are available.

The replacement of Northeast Station has been the highest priority for the Department’s construction program since completion of the Proposition Q projects and the new Police Administration Building. The City family, including the Office of the Chief Administrative Officer, the Chief Legislative Analyst, the Bureau of Engineering and the Architects of the facility all worked together with the LAPD to make the Northeast project possible out of the existing bond funds. We expect to break ground in the summer of 2012. Before then, Facilities Management Division will be meeting with Northeast employees to provide them with information on the project and solicit their input.

Officer Safety

As your Chief, your safety is my top priority. I am always looking for ways to improve safety for you. But officer safety is not just about wearing your seatbelt or dodging bullets. Officer safety entails much more.

Recently there have been reports in the media of law enforcement personnel from other agencies resorting to fraudulent schemes or other law breaking actions because of precarious financial positions their lifestyle put them in. Careers and families have been lost. This is unfortunate and more importantly, unnecessary.

One of the benefits of working for LAPD is the variety of help available to you. Organizations such as the Los Angeles Police Relief Association and the Los Angeles Police Protective League, along with internal sections such as Behavioral Science Services, have services available to assist you in a time of need. Whether it’s financial, personal or even emotional distress, there is someone here to help. Use that help. Don't forget about our Department peer counselors and support groups always available to you as well.

The key to everything is to keep a watchful eye on each other. If one of your partners is in physical danger, you grab them by the Sam-brown. If one of your partners is in financial trouble, get them the help they need. We are a family and family takes care of each other.

Purple Heart Ceremony

During the month of September we begin a new tradition which recognizes the brave actions of some of our most heroic officers. The new Purple Heart Medal will serve as a reminder to the many life and death dangers you face every day.

For the first time in our Department’s history, we are awarding the Purple Heart Medal for meritorious service to officers who have sustained traumatic physical injury during an on-duty tactical situation, and posthumously to the next of kin in the name of officers killed or have died of wounds received in the line of duty.

The Department is proud to present this award as an opportunity to commemorate the extraordinary sacrifices of noble Los Angeles Police Department officers. The first Purple Heart ceremony will be held at the JW Marriott at L.A. Live on September 15, 2011. I hope you can join us for this very special event.

Thoughts and Prayers

In late July, five of our officers suffered serious duty related injuries during two separate incidents in Topanga and Hollenbeck Areas. In the first incident, four officers from Topanga Division were involved in a serious T/C which resulted in each of them being hospitalized for injuries sustained. Police Officers Brian Thornton and Kurt Logan were treated for minor injuries and released. Police Officer Francisco Rubio was admitted to the hospital, treated and released a few days later. However, Police Officer Mark De la Torre suffered major injuries and was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit where he remains hospitalized, in serious condition, as I write this month’s article.

In the second incident, Police Officer Allan Krish, Hollenbeck Division, was stabbed during a violent confrontation with a 415 man. Thankfully, Officer Krish is expected to make a full recovery from his injuries.

These incidents are yet another reminder of the dangers we face every day as Los Angeles Police Officers. Please keep these five officers in your prayers and please keep an eye out for all your brother and sister officers. I want to remind you to always be aware of your surroundings, watch everyone’s hands, assume nothing and expect the unexpected.


Chief of Police Message - August 2011

Mid Year Crime Stats

With summer now in full swing and half of the year already over, the fruits of our labor are taking shape. Trends have been established and goals are within reach.  As you continue to serve the people of Los Angeles know that your work is making a real difference.  Every day the people count on you to keep them safe and you have not disappointed.

My review of mid-year crime numbers shows we are on pace for a ninth straight year of overall decline in crime. This is truly astonishing. Even with the odds stacked against us and a major fiscal crisis, we still manage to drive crime down to numbers this City has not seen in decades.  Nobody does more with less than you do and for that you should be tremendously proud.

Here are some key specifics.

Compared with the first half of 2010, as of June violent crime is down 9.6%, property crimes decreased 7.3% and Part I crimes fell 7.7%.  Even more telling is the homicide rate.  Compared with the first six months of 2010 homicides are down 8.1%.  We can all take deep personal pride in these results.

Particularly impressive is your attack on gang crime, which accounts for more than half of our total crime. Year to date gang-related aggravated assaults are down 7.7%, gang-related rapes are down 21.4% and total gang crime has been reduced 16.1%.  

Let’s never forget, these are not just numbers, they are people. Every percentage drop in crime, means fewer victims, fewer people who feel the deep personal pain of criminal victimization.  When I say you are making a difference, know that it is true.

Plenty of work remains to be done.  We can never rest on our laurels. As we continue forward, use this positive momentum to your advantage.  Let’s continue to make Los Angeles America’s safest big city.

LAPD Heroes Under Fire

On June 27th, Hollywood Area Officers Michael Kim and Jimmy Lam were working traffic control after a Monday morning hit-and-run traffic collision near Santa Monica Boulevard and Western Avenue when they saw a Dodge Caravan unrelated to the traffic collision stopped at a nearby traffic light.  Heavy black smoke poured from under the Caravan.  After calling the LAFD, officers tried to free the occupant from the van but she was unaware of the danger and did not understand what the officers wanted her to do.

As thick smoke filled the van, the driver finally realized she needed to unlock the doors but in the chaos of the moment she could not free herself from her seatbelt.  Officer Kim used his pocketknife to cut her loose.  Then, as toxic smoke and flames engulfed the vehicle, the officers pulled the victim from the vehicle and used fire extinguishers from their police car to fight the fire until LAFD arrived.

Officers Kim and Lam’s decisive and brave actions, taken without regard for their personal safety, saved a human life.  We are all proud to be associated with people who willingly take these kinds of risks for a fellow man or woman.

At the same time, we must be continually vigilant against the rising dangers of policing in our City.  While crime rates are down violence against police officers is on the rise, both locally and nationally.  2010 was the deadliest on record for law enforcement officers nationwide.  Be extra careful out there.  Don’t make assumptions. Treat everyone with respect while always putting officer safety first.

New MOUs

For more than a year our civilian employees have endured the hardship of mandatory furloughs. Furlough days hurt everyone. Employees lose vitally needed income and the Department’s critical work goes undone.

Recently, members of the Coalition of LA City Unions voted to accept changes in their compensation in order to end furlough days.  This was a significant sacrifice which benefits the Department and City as a whole.  This concession, while not ideal, was needed in order to obtain increased stability.  I want to thank all of our civilians who voted to ratify the amendments and I look forward to moving on as a group, focusing on the business of keeping our City safe.  

Some civilian employees who are not a part of the Coalition still may be subject to mandatory furloughs. Please know the entire Department stands with and supports you during this difficult time.  Your continued hardship is on the minds of many. I hope we can quickly come to a solution that eliminates mandatory furloughs for all.

Over the past few months much work and many hours went into negotiations on a new Memorandum of Understanding for sworn employees.  We are finally at a point at which a majority of our workforce has contracts for the next three years.  I was not directly involved in negotiations, but I did pay careful attention and clearly understand the feelings of uncertainty you were feeling.  I want to thank everyone for your patience and understanding throughout this process.  You maintained the professionalism which has made our organization the world-class agency it is and I am deeply grateful.

Coffee at Harbor Station

Last month I had the privilege of attending an open meeting at Harbor Station. I was particularly pleased that the meeting was attended by a substantial number of civilian as well as sworn personnel. A good deal of our conversation centered on the problems caused by our extremely tight budget. We had a very fruitful and open exchange of ideas, complaints and suggestions. I really appreciate the willingness of everyone, especially civilian employees, to be direct, open and frank about their concerns.  I hope I succeeded in conveying to all the extremely high value I place on the work done by our civilian employees.  Over decades of service on the Department, I have come to appreciate just how vital our civilian employees are to the Department and the people of Los Angeles.  Our solidarity in these tough times has paid off in a safer city and will continue to reap benefits in the future when the economy recovers and we can reward all who have persevered thorough the present stresses.

Western States Police & Fire Games

In early June, the Western States Police and Fire games were held in Ontario. More than 10,000 full-time and retired firefighters and law enforcement personnel, including about 350 officers from our Department, competed in 64 sporting events.  Having been involved in Department sports for many years and having competed in these games, in basketball and in other events, I take great pride in knowing you are keeping the competitive spirit alive.

Some of the highlights of the games included our bowling team taking home 14 total medals, our wrestling team bringing back 10 medals, our paintball team winning a gold and bronze medal, our baseball team earning a gold medal and the LAPD “Hit Squad” coed softball club going undefeated in their two day tournament and bringing home a gold medal.

These are just some of the many successes our Department achieved.  Whether its police and fire games, local tournaments or intra-departmental scrimmages, our Department is one that not only competes but competes at a high level.  Keep up the excellent work and I look forward to hearing joining many of you at the upcoming World Police and Fire Games being held later this month in New York.


Chief of Police Message - July 2011

Patrolling the streets of Los Angeles is the first assignment a police officer works after graduating from the academy. While the experiences and lessons learned are invaluable, the true gratification for police officers sinks in well after officers respond to a 911 call and make an arrest. The follow-up in the aftermath of an incident; the detective work to find clues; the scientific work to narrow down a search; all of these skills and much tough, unglamorous work are vital to any police force. The gratification of telling a victim their suspect is in custody is what our line of work is all about.

The public must have confidence in us to not only prevent crime but solve it. Recent arrests in some very high profile cases have rightly earned LAPD some well deserved recognition. The downward crime trend continues and the people of Los Angeles are feeling a heightened sense of security. This is something for which we can justly feel very proud.

Our Department solves the big cases. During the past year, you helped bring one of the most notorious serial killers this City has ever seen to justice…The Grim Sleeper. His reign of terror came to an end thanks to the unprecedented perseverance and professional investigative effort by LAPD detectives.

Teamwork and pulling together during difficult times or serious threats to the community are a part of how we do business. Recently this was the case where Olympic, Wilshire and Southwest Areas experienced a series of highly publicized robberies in which the suspect was armed with a shotgun. There were strong indications two recent murders in Olympic and Wilshire were the work of this “shotgun bandit”, who had committed nine robberies in a short span of two weeks. The viciousness of murdering a citizen who offered no resistance heightened the urgency to identify the suspects and capture them before another murder would occur. Detectives had few leads in and theorized that both victims were being robbed prior to their demise. The Olympic, Wilshire & Southwest Areas met together to share information, and develop a strategy to end this violent crime spree. Their planning and teamwork developed a great lead, which was quickly shared with everyone from the patrol level on up. Thanks to a quickly circulated vehicle description, Wilshire Senior Lead Officer Spiro Roditis was able to spot the suspect vehicle and take two suspects into custody.

This great teamwork didn’t end with these arrests. The combined investigative efforts of Wilshire & Olympic detectives, who worked jointly on not only two murders, but eight robberies led to a series of filings by the District Attorney’s Office. The work on this case is far from done but the cooperation of these Areas to identify and arrest these vicious suspects illuminates the wealth of expertise, professionalism and dedicated service at the Area level. Area supervisors, officers and detectives are routinely solving complex crime trends and series each day on this Department and I thank each and every one of you.

By these kinds of extraordinary efforts, we are sending an important message to the criminal element; if you break the law, we will find you and arrest you. Not only is this at the core of what we are entrusted to do, but your success in solving crimes and putting criminals behind bars allows me to tell your story and get you the resources you need to do the job.

It’s not just the big cases that matter. I know that many of you are working hard and making great arrests that really make a difference in the communities you serve. When I hear of the good work you are doing, I make it a point to write a personal desk note to each of you, expressing my pride and appreciation.

World Police and Fire GamesSome of you will be heading to New York City to participate in the 2011 World Police and Fire Games from August 26 through September 5, 2011. This bi-annual event has become the second largest multi-sport event in the world, surpassed only by the Summer Olympics. As you continue to train and prepare for this competition, keep close to heart your sworn brothers and sisters from the New York Police Department and other agencies who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. These games will respectfully coincide with the ten year remembrance of that tragic day. I look forward to hearing your stories of triumph as you represent our Department with dignity and class.

Budget

It will come as no surprise that the Department continues to struggle with budgetary constraints created by the City’s financial crisis. As of this writing, the LAPPL is still involved in contract negotiations that will affect many of you.

It goes without saying, but I’ll say it anyway. I deeply appreciate the way in which the men and women, sworn and civilian, of the LAPD have come together in these financially difficult times. I hope you will continue to support one another whenever you discover a coworker is financially, emotionally or otherwise under great stress. The LAPD family has never needed each other more than now, and it has never been stronger than it is today. We are indeed blessed to have each other to lean on. Thank you, and be safe.


Chief of Police Message - June 2011

As we reach the halfway point of this year, your efforts to reduce crime and keep our City safe have put us on the path to yet another historic reduction in crime for 2011.  In a time of great economic uncertainty you have continued to display a resilience and commitment to the people of Los Angeles. You make me proud to be your Chief.

Summer is our busiest time of year.  Children are out of school on summer break, often with nothing to keep them occupied.  This is why programs such as “Summer Night Lights” become such an important part of keeping the City safe. 

This year the Summer Night Lights program has proposed expanding to include 32 parks throughout the City, up from 24 last year.  Giving children a safe haven is crucial during the time of year when they are most vulnerable to negative influences.  The Summer Night Lights program is now seen as a model for the rest of the nation and the difference you make in children’s lives by your willingness to participate is huge.     

One of our other summer events geared towards children is the Safe Summer Tip-Off youth basketball event.  Now in its second year, the 2011 Safe Summer Tip-Off happens June 25 at the University of Southern California Galen Center.  The goal is to bring young people together in a positive and fun filled environment to kick off the summer season with safe, community enriching activities.  Once again our officers will be taking on the Los Angeles City Fire Department in a winner-take-all basketball game.  Last year our team pulled out a win and I expect the same again this year.  But the real winners in this event are the youth.  I encourage you all to come out and participate in this wonderful event.

Summer also means baseball season is in full swing and nothing says summer like a game at Dodger Stadium.    But an assault on a San Francisco Giants fan opening day created an atmosphere that required the increased presence of LAPD officers.  Fans of America’s favorite past-time should never feel in danger while attending a game.  This is why I am proud of what you have done to make Dodger Stadium safe.  You have made a huge difference in the reality and perception of safety at Dodger Stadium and for that the City of Los Angeles is forever grateful. 

This month we also celebrate the presence of our gay brother and sister LAPD employees, both those who are open and those who chose to be private about their sexual orientation.  Our Department’s diversity reflects the make-up of our City and it enables us to better protect and serve all of our communities. 

We are also working with the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) community through outreach programs such as the LGBT Community Police Academy.  This academy is one of the few of its kind in the nation and offers its participants an opportunity to learn more about the workings of the Department and the issues that cause problems in our communities.  The current class is scheduled to graduate on    June 2 at the Elysian Park Police Academy.  I will be there for that event. In addition, I will also be riding in the Annual Los Angeles Pride Parade on June 12 in West Hollywood.

Baker to Vegas  
Each year the Baker to Vegas relay race inspires stories of physical triumph and personal satisfaction.  The camaraderie generated by this event is truly unique.  I was thrilled to be at this year’s race and honored to be the first Chief to run a leg since the late Daryl Francis Gates.  My first run was back in 1979 when it was the Death Valley Relay when I ran for the Southeast Division team. Running this year brought back many great memories of the days when I was a young cop with a lot more speed and a few less pounds.

Our Women’s Team, running in honor of Tina Kerbrat, the first female officer killed in the line of duty, took home top honors in their division.  Our Department Men’s Team, competing for the first time, took home third place in the open division.  All of our 34 sworn and civilian teams that participated in this year’s race should be proud of the way they represented our agency and the sportsmanship they displayed.  A special thank you goes out to all of the support teams who drove that slow speed trek though the desert.  Without you this event could not be possible.  Congratulations to all of our teams and I hope to see all of you there again next year.
Budget

I know many of you are concerned over the ongoing budget issues facing our City.  We are still engaged in the budget process and it is our goal to keep you up to date and informed as developments play out.  I appreciate your continued patience in this process.  I understand everyone is experiencing feelings of uncertainty and I will provide periodic updates on the LANs.


Chief of Police Message - May 2011

Police memorial month

Police work is not for everyone. It takes a special type of person to wear the uniform and don our badge. Risk comes with the territory. When you signed up, you so did knowing the risks involved. Yet here you are, serving the people of Los Angeles with a level of professionalism that is second to none. But knowing there are risks does not protect us from harm. This was never more apparent than in the early hours of Monday, April 4, when 22-year veteran Metropolitan Division K9 handler Steven Jenkins responded to a domestic violence complaint in the 13600 block of Dronfield Avenue in Sylmar.

Steve was shot in the jaw and shoulder. His injuries were life-threatening and we are so thankful and hopeful that he will make a full recovery. The road to recuperation will be long and hard, but with the support of his family and his LAPD family, he will not travel that road alone. Please keep him in your thoughts and prayers.

Not every tale of heroism ends with recovery. Too often our Department has seen tragedy in its ultimate form. Since becoming your chief, I have had to bury two of our finest officers who died serving our country overseas. Their loss adds to the other 202 officers who gave their all in the line of duty. We will always keep their memories alive in our Department’s history.

On May 5, 2011, we will hold our annual police memorial ceremony in front of the Police Administration Building (PAB). Remembered at the ceremony will be our latest casualty, Police Officer II Joshua Cullins. Josh was killed in action on active duty in Afghanistan. A proud United States Marine, Josh was last assigned to Central Area and was well respected amongst his peers. His untimely passing reminds us all of how fragile life can be. I am in awe at the sacrifices our officers and their families make to serve our country and our communities.  

Josh Cullins’ name will be added to our memorial wall, as well as our website LAPDOnline.org. The “Gone but Not Forgotten” feature is also available on the Department LAN. During the month of May, I join you in the tradition of wearing the black mourning band on my badge in honor of all our fallen officers.

 

“LAPD” on display

As part of efforts to remember fallen officers the Los Angeles Police Historical Society, in partnership with the Los Angeles Times, will be displaying thirteen photos of LAPD officers, not been seen in decades, and the news articles which will tell their stories. The display, located in the PAB lobby, goes as far back as 1911.  The next time you are downtown, please take a moment to come by and see this touching remembrance of our fallen heroes.

 

Officer safety

Officer safety is and will always be one of my top priorities. I am always looking for ways to improve, whether through training, tactics, and equipment or just looking out for each other.  Safety is always in the forefront of any decision I make. 

The Department recently acquired funding to purchase 1,200 tactical holsters, for Tasers, which many of you have been requesting. These new holsters will replace the current version, which is widely viewed as cumbersome and problematic. We expect to begin the distribution of the holsters by the end of this month.

In addition to the holsters, we may be able to secure enough funds to purchase another 1,500 Tasers, a big step. It is my goal to be able to provide Tasers for every officer. This would give officers another force option and reduce the risk of serious injury to both officers and the public.  

One of the greatest risks to officers in the field is driving. Aggressive driving increases the possibility of a serious traffic collision. Getting to the scene of a call fast is less important than getting to the scene safely. Please wear your seatbelts. Seatbelts can save your life.

 

Medal of Valor

Every May we recognize the heroic actions of a courageous few during the Medal of Valor ceremony. Over the years there have been many dramatic incidents of courage, sacrifice, bravery and heroism, resulting in lives saved and tragedies averted. While most Medal of Valor recipients will tell you they were just doing their job, don’t be fooled.  These men and women went above and beyond the call of duty, risking their own wellbeing in the process. 

This year we have 10 recipients. Their compelling stories are now a part of the Department’s Medal of Valor history. Here is a complete list of the 2011 Medal of Valor recipients:

Retired Sergeant I Roy Gardner (# 22222), Southeast Division

Police Officer II Owen Berger (#37319), Southeast Division

Police Officer II Thorsten Timmermans (#37459), Southeast Division

Police Officer III Custodio Ponce (#27071), Hollenbeck Division

Detective III Rafael Acosta (#26780), Hollenbeck Division

Detective II Daniel Hanabusa (#30828), Hollenbeck Division

Police Officer II Rudolph Rivera (#34735), Hollenbeck Division

Police Officer II Jose Salazar (#35827), Hollenbeck Division

Police Officer II Benjamin Aguilera (#36361), Hollenbeck Division

Police Officer II Roy Reza (#32491), Hollenbeck Division

 

Congratulations to all of this year’s recipients on a job well done.

Finally, I cannot say often enough how very proud I am of the job you do for the people of our City.  We have made tremendous strides in implementing constitutional policing, while at the same time reducing crime to historic lows. That these accomplishments were made during a period of severe fiscal austerity makes them even more remarkable. We are truly blessed to be able to work with each other and accomplish so much.


Chief of Police Message - April 2011

Policing a world-class City like Los Angeles comes with a certain level of increased responsibility.  Our City is a prime destination for some of the biggest events in the country.  Over the past few weeks, Los Angeles hosted the Grammy Awards, the NBA All-Star game, the Academy Awards and the L.A. Marathon.  Not only do these events draw hundreds of thousands of people from around the world and the nation, they also create an opportunity to demonstrate the importance of public safety.  Again and again, the Los Angeles Police Department meets these challenges and exceeds expectations.  Thanks to your professionalism and courtesy, many visitors came away with a positive impression of the LAPD.  I’m very proud of each and every one of you and thank you for a job well done.      

Successfully policing large events such as these, while handling the day to day police work all over the City, does not go unnoticed.  It is no accident I was able to announce good news for our detention officers.  Thanks to Councilman Greig Smith, Chair of the LA City Council’s Public Safety Committee, we recently received enough money from a city trust fund to suspend furlough days for our detention officers.  Having the detention officers back at full strength means 27 police officers can get back on the street.  It’s a small win for now. But I haven’t given up exploring other opportunities like this for the rest of our civilian staff.  I will do all I can, however, everyone must recognize this is a tough budget year and keeping what we already have should be viewed as a success.

 

Reserve Officer Appreciation

 They are protecting and serving alongside all of you, each and every day…and they do it for nothing but for the love and passion they have for the job.  They are the men and women who are LAPD Reserve Officers. 

 The history of the Los Angeles Police Department Reserves dates back to World War II when military enlistments and the draft depleted the ranks of qualified full-time officers and LAPD turned to the residents of the community to fill the gap. Today  Reserve Officers come from all walks of life. They bring to us a wide variety of useful skill sets and qualities that enrich our department. Today more than 800 officers in the Reserve Corps serve our City with distinction, honor and pride. 

 As a former Reserve Officer myself, I am especially proud of our Reserve Corps and salute them.  During the month of April, we recognize their commitment, not only to the LAPD, but the people of Los Angeles.  I look forward to honoring them on April 2nd during our annual “Twice a Citizen Awards Ceremony”.  On April 23rd, we will host a BBQ Appreciation Day for Reserves and their families at PAB.

 

Baker to Vegas

 The month of April also means it is time for the Baker to Vegas Challenge Cup Relay April 16-17.  For those of you competing, your hard work and dedication to bring home a winning title will soon pay off.  And to the support team members, I commend you for the many long hours you’ve sacrificed and will dedicate on the day of the race.  In its 27th year, the race brings new challenges.  Our Department Team will compete for the first time and our Women’s Team is competing in honor of our fallen officer, Tina Kerbrat.  I’m confident you will represent the LAPD well, and come out on top in several categories.  Good luck to you all and I look forward to seeing you at the finish line.

 

Coffee at Van Nuys Station

After my first ‘coffee stop’ at Hollywood Station, I visited the roll call room at Van Nuys.  I recognize that concerns still linger about the budget, transfers and promotions for the rank and file as well as furloughs of our civilian workforce.  I can only reassure you by restating that eventually things will get better but until then we still have a rough road ahead of us.  Please keep this in mind when you express your needs and desires to the league as it begins contract negotiations.  While the Department has saved nearly $80 million so far, we are being asked to save even more in the next year.  

A number of officers asked about the large events (Laker Parade and Raves) the City hosts and related costs to police them.  Under specific circumstances the City does receive some reimbursement for police services rendered for large events.  It is our intention to continue seeking reimbursement when the services requested are above and beyond what a particular bureau or Department can provide.

Another question that came up concerned radio calls for theft from trash cans or recycling bins.  In the past, these calls were dispatched Code 2 when the PR reports the suspect is still at scene; otherwise it is broadcast to all units as “info only”.  As a direct result of your input, the protocols have been modified and a non-coded radio call will be dispatched only when the suspect is still at scene, otherwise it will always be an “info only” broadcast. 

Another change will be implemented this month as a direct result of your suggestions to standardize the RFC short form citation.  After extensive research and discussions with the City Attorney, approved protocols and revisions will be published in an Operations Order that should reduce the time required to complete the majority of the RFCs. 

Lastly, in recent discussions officers expressed concern about the adjudications of Bias Policing investigations.  I understand that it is rumored that most of these complaints have been adjudicated as Not Resolved.  This is not the case. Here are the facts. 

Looking at investigations closed since 2007, the average number of investigations per year is 200. The adjudications were: 85.1% are Unfounded; 5.92% are Insufficient Evidence to Adjudicate; 4.49 are No Misconduct; 3.27% are No Department Employee; .51% are Demonstrably False; .41% are Not Resolved and .10 % are Exonerated.

Numbers for cases closed in 2010 the numbers are pretty similar to the four year average with 90.16% Unfounded and 1.37% Not Resolved.  While the investigative process is exhaustive and requires a high level of scrutiny, I have yet to Sustain a single complaint for Biased Policing, so please do not get discouraged or caught up in the process itself.  I support this process because, in the end, it only demonstrates that you are doing your jobs in a professional and constitutional manner.  Know that I support you, as does the Department.